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Could a Tiny House Be Right for Your Parent?

Lots of older adults start to think about downsizing when caring for a large home becomes more difficult due to age. The average home in the United States is around 2,600 square feet, and that’s far more house than an older adult may be able to handle. Maybe you’re thinking about helping your parent to downsize. If so, have you ever considered a tiny house?

What Is a Tiny House?

Senior Care Media PA - Could a Tiny House Be Right for Your Parent?

Senior Care Media PA – Could a Tiny House Be Right for Your Parent?

Tiny houses are any house that is smaller than 1,000 square feet, but most are between 100 and 400 square feet. Many have wheels, so they can be towed behind a truck and moved from place to place. They are usually designed to maximize the small space using unique storage ideas and spaces that are capable of multiple functions.

Although tiny houses are catching on with the younger set as a way of starting their lives with less debt, they are becoming increasingly popular with older adults as well. In fact, about 40 percent of people who own tiny houses are age 50 or older.

What Are the Benefits of a Tiny House?

Tiny houses just might be the perfect solution for some seniors who are still able to live independently, but who need a little help. Some of the benefits of older adults living in tiny houses are:

Lower Expenses: A tiny house costs between $23,000 and around $60,000 for a custom-built tiny house. That’s a lot less than the average house. They also cost less to heat and cool.

Mobility: A tiny house on wheels allows your parent to live away from you while they are still able, but to move closer when they need more assistance. In fact, they may be able to move right into your back yard!

Less Upkeep: A tiny house requires less upkeep than a full-sized house. There’s less space, so there’s less to clean.

Things to Consider

Of course, living in a tiny house may not be for everyone. There are certainly some things to consider before going tiny, such as:

  • Living tiny requires downsizing in a big way. There will be much less room for possessions, so they’ll have to get rid of more.
  • If you’re considering putting your parent’s tiny house on your land, you’ll have to check into your area’s zoning laws first.
  • Older adults with hobbies that require a lot of space may have a difficult time adjusting. For example, if your mom likes to sew and has a large fabric stash, she may have to store it elsewhere.

Even with a tiny home, your parent may still need the help of an in-home caregiver—and that’s okay! Professional senior care providers can help your parent regardless of where they live. A senior care aide can come to your parent’s tiny house and assist them with things like cleaning, medicine reminders, and laundry. A senior care provider can even use their tiny kitchen to prepare healthy meals for them. Or, they can simply stop by to check on your aging parent while you are at work, giving them something to look forward to and a companion to spend a few hours with.

Sources:  https://www.aarp.org/home-family/your-home/info-2018/tiny-house-retirement-fd.html

https://www.aarp.org/livable-communities/housing/info-2015/tiny-houses-are-becoming-a-big-deal.html

If you or an aging loved one are considering Senior Care Services in Media PA, please contact the caring staff at True Direct Home Health Care today.

Perry C. Doc Alleva, Owner & Administrator

Owner & Administrator at True Direct Home Health Care
True Direct HHC owner and administrator, Perry C. Doc Alleva has been in the health care community for over 10 years as a therapy solutions provider, as well as a home care services coordinator. He has extensive experience in caring for the disabled and the surgical acute, sub-acute, and rehab population. Rooted in his home-town city of Philadelphia, with strong ties to it's vast neighborhoods and communities, he's now focusing all his energies towards innovating the home health care agency's role in providing the essential care needed from individual to the family throughout the community.

Doc, as he is called by everyone - staff, patients and clients - first experienced home health care and hospice care while as a colleg student at King's College as he cared for his mother every day while she first battled COPD and then lung cancer. It was during this time that he came to understand that caring for a patient was more than just clinical expertise.

"Admittedly, my strongest attribute is my communication skills and the simple fact that I love to help people. Even the smallest thing you can do for someone really can mean so much to them long term. In fact, it could change them forever. That's what providing quality personal home health care should be all about."

In his spare time, he cooks for homeless shelters and children's music and arts events. He also is highly involved in his local youth sports soccer academy as a coach and Board member.